IT'S JUST ANOTHER DAY

A blog about a life awakened and rejuvenated around Western New York.


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HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE – BROADWAY MARKET AT EASTERTIME

BUFFALO'S BROADWAY MARKET

BUFFALO’S BROADWAY MARKET

“Bring your car, come and park it. Meet me at the Broadway Market!”

Surveying the Polish Sausages.

Surveying the Polish Sausages.

A Tradition, tried and true. An Old World Market in the heart of the city district of Buffalo, known as “Polonia”. The Broadway Market, a Western New York Landmark, has stood to serve the Polish community for decades. This is the place to be as Easter time draws near. Treats and goodies are found here, and Polish foods have become the staples of  the Swieconka Easter meal. Aromatic Polish sausages (both smoked and fresh) fill the air. The fanciful painted Easter eggs in the Old World style draw the eye and elicits memories of youthful times with family and friends. Breads and butter lambs, and the famous Broadway Market Horseradish, the “bitter herbs” of traditional times all complete the feast. Each food is symbolic in representing Christ’s journey during Holy Week and at Easter.

Easter flowers on display

Easter flowers on display

Easter flowers add their fragrances with Lilies, azaleas, hyacinths, and tulips available amongst others. It is a festival of sorts, as Tony Krew, of Buffalo’s Krew Brothers Polka Band parades down the aisle with his accordion to play polish favorites. But with the times comes mush change as the Market has presumed an International flavor with Middle Eastern fair along with Native American music and even a man with his barrel organ (sans monkey) to complete the scene. 

Much to see at the Broadway Market - Janice picks her Easter lily.

Much to see at the Broadway Market – Janice picks her Easter lily.

Attending the 9:30 mass at the Mother Church of Buffalo’s Polish Community, St. Stanislaus Bishop and Martyr R.C Church, it was the perfect time for my wife, Janice and I to check out the wares on this yearly Pilgrimage. This week will spell a savory trek to the Polish Mecca, in the shadow of  Buffalo’s New York Central Terminal, for no Easter is truly complete in Buffalo without a visit to the Broadway Market.  IMG_0894

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT THE BROADWAY MARKET LINK HERE!


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HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE – THE CITY OF LIGHT AND THE PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION, 1901

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The Ethnology Building in the evening
Pan-American Exposition, 1901

 

When you hear the term “City of Light” people presume someone is referring to Paris, France. They would be correct in that assumption, The Age of Enlightenment had Paris as its center of ideas and education. Its intellectual preeminence earned Paris its title as the City of Light. The lighting of its city streets in the last quarter of the 19th century reinforced Paris’s claim on the moniker.

In the early 20th century, the city of Buffalo, New York began calling itself the City of Light. Plentiful hydroelectric power from nearby Niagara Falls helped support that claim, but also because it was the first city in America to have electric street lights. During the 1901 Pan-American Exposition, this was made clearly evident, as the illumination of the buildings and avenues made night time enjoyment of the “world fair” of sorts, a reality. The area where the exposition was held shows very few reminders of this landmark happening during Buffalo’s early days. Interest in the event waned quickly when United States President William McKinley was assassinated while receiving guests at the expo. Anarchist Leon Czolgosz was responsible for killing McKinley and vaulting Vice-President Theodore Roosevelt to the presidency.

The Pan-American Exposition of 1901 played an important part in the development of Buffalo as a city, as it shined a spotlight literally on the “City of Light”

Find more information about the Pan-American Exposition of 1901 at these sites:

Pan-American Exposition – Wikipedia
“Doing the Pan” – The Pan-American Exposition
1901 Pan-American Exposition Buffalo, New York Photos


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HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE – NIAGARA FALLS

American Falls - Niagara Falls

American Falls – Niagara Falls

Her call is loud and thundering, a torrent of water across the precipice here and over the “Horseshoe” (the Canadian side of Niagara Falls). Feeding Lake Ontario with the flow Lake Erie sends her, an unending cycle of life.

Nik_Wallenda_Niagara_Falls_2012Legendary and fabled, from barrel to a high-wire cable (Nik Wallenda‘s trek across the cavernous gorge) she has seen her share of daredevils and whack-jobs looking for the fame of a name in defiance. Triumphs unfortunately, are very few.

But the view (especially at night when the lights perform in unison to offer more beauty, if that was possible) is awe inspiring. If you are desiring adventure at the hands of Mother Nature, there is plenty to see and feel (you catch a good spray on a decent day) at the hands of Niagara Falls. One of the true wonders of the world, and the honeymooning isn’t bad either!

Visit this link NIAGARA FALLS , to find out more.


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HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE – KLEINHANS MUSIC HALL

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Buffalo and the surrounding areas of Western New York is a trove of many wonderful treasures. No less brilliant of them all is the KLEINHANS MUSIC HALL.

This palace of musical wonder is considered one of the most acoustically perfect music halls in the world. The home of the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra (BPO – to be featured in a future H,T&E segment) this Music Hall has been designated a National Historic Landmark, and has been acclaimed by the likes of Jascha Heifetz, Artur Rubenstein and Serge Koussevitzsky.

It has also housed many renown Musical Directors, among them Michael Tilson Thomas, Semyon Bychkov, Maximiano Valdes and currently JoAnn Falletta (Another to be featured in a “Being For The Benefit of…” piece). Pops Conductors have included Doc Severinsen and the late Marvin Hamlisch.

For the full scoop on KLEINHANS MUSIC HALL, Click the link provided.


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BEING FOR THE BENEFIT OF… ROY HOBBS

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Iris Gaines: You know, I believe we have two lives.
Roy Hobbs: How… what do you mean?
Iris Gaines: The life we learn with and the life we live with after that.

                             ~ Dialogue from “The Natural”

Movies if well made, stand the test of time. In this Baseball classic based on Bernard Malamud’s novel, “The Natural”, the hero Roy Hobbs steps out of a self-imposed obscurity to become the best ball player in the game. The lessons learned in a lifetime of learning gave Hobbs the basis for a new future after baseball.

The stadium and other venues around Western New York, became the backdrop for many of the scenes in the movie, The Natural.

With big names like Robert Redford, Glenn Close, Robert Duvall, Kim Bassinger and Darren McGavin setting up shop here, Buffalo took on an almost surreal sense. Seeing familiar sites portrayed as clearly as day on the big screen, gave Buffalonians (auto-correct wants to change this to Babylonians) another sense. It gave them a sense of pride.

War Memorial Stadium (the “Rockpile”) became Knight’s Field, home of the fictitious New York Knights. The original home of the Buffalo Bills of the AFL, and long-time home of the Buffalo Bison Baseball club, the “Rockpile” took on legendary status here (as did the Memorial Auditorium, “The Aud”, where the Buffalo Sabres – ‘NHL’ and the Los Angeles Clippers (as the Buffalo Braves ‘NBA’) had their beginnings.)

The “Hotel Ellicott” in the movie changed the function of the Ellicott Square Building. ESB is an office complex which at the time it was built hailed as the largest office building in the world. The site also claimed the first dedicated movie theater known to exist. It was named for Joseph Ellicott, the purveyor who planned the then Village of Buffalo.

My favorite building in the area, the Buffalo Central Terminal stood in for the Chicago Train Station, with interior scenes captured there.

The candy shop where Roy Hobbs and his girl Iris meet while the Knights are in Chicago, is in reality The Parkside Candy Shoppe keeping its name and function, although losing its location on Main Street in Buffalo.

Buffalo’s All-High Stadium doubled as Chicago’s Wrigley Field during the filming of “The Natural”.

The NYC Maternity Hospital that Roy Hobbs was taken to was “portrayed” by the Buffalo Psychiatric Center. The center currently is not open to the public. Crazy, right?

Other memorable scenes in the film include: South Dayton, New York as the Water stop / Carnival where Roy strikes out “The Whammer” on three pitches as the Hobbs Family farm found its location in Stafford, New York.

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Other films had their origins in and around Buffalo, but not to the scope of “The Natural”. It shined a bright light on the city and people of Buffalo and the surrounding area.

For more in-depth descriptions of these locales,
visit FORGOTTEN BUFFALO


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HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE – OUR LADY OF VICTORY NATIONAL SHRINE AND BASILICA

Dome and spires of Our Lady of Victory National Shrine & Basilica in Lackawanna

Dome and spires of Our Lady of Victory National Shrine & Basilica in Lackawanna, NY

Chosen randomly to be highlighted and explored, is the Our Lady of Victory National Shrine and Basilica (quite a mouthful) in Lackawanna New York. This impressive structure is awe inspiring, and the storied history of this church and the surrounding complex in this quiet, one-time bustling steel making city should be read.

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Monsignor Nelson H. Baker 1841-1936

Among its many accomplishments, the Basilica is the final resting place for the man responsible for its existence, and his dedication and works of charity have put Monsignor Nelson Baker, most commonly known as “Father Baker”, on course to undergo the process for Canonization.  Pope Benedict XVI declared Father Baker Venerable on January 14, 2011. A museum touting his life draws many thousands of visitors annually.

An interesting fact: The Angels

“There are a thousand angels in the Basilica,” Father Baker once said. According to estimates, the actual number ranges anywhere from 1,500 to 2,500. The plan was to place an angel in every possible sight line.

For more information about this Western New York landmark click on the link:   Our Lady Of Victory National Shrine and Basilica


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HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE – PEACE BRIDGE

Peace Bridge joining Buffalo and Fort Erie, Canada

Peace Bridge joining Buffalo and Fort Erie, Canada

The scene highlighted above is the Peace Bridge. It is a free standing structure that spans the Niagara River and joins the City of Buffalo, New York with the Town of Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada.

For more information please visit: PEACE BRIDGE

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GOING OVER THE BRIDGE

Back in the day, before Homeland Security and terrorist threats, crossing the bridge into Canada was an afterthought. It was a trek we made on a weekly basis. And we were just kids.

Growing up on the border with out great Canadian neighbors, we were exposed early to the game of hockey. A good pair of “rabbit ears” could squeeze the signal for CHCH-TV (Channel 11 around the Buff) and a chance to view CFL (Canadian Football League) games and curling on Saturday afternoons. But the kids up and down the street would congregate to whose ever house had the best reception to catch the Maple Leafs playing hockey at Maple Leaf Garden in Toronto. Buffalo had a minor league hockey team, the Buffalo Bisons who had served as an affiliate to the Chicago Blackhawks, New York Rangers and the storied Montreal Canadiens over the years. We made the game our popular favorite long before we would land our own NHL team (Buffalo Sabres)

It stood to reason that having caught the “bug” that we would attempt to imitate our hockey heroes. A bunch of American kids with little equipment available to them, but a load of frozen creek to make our rink. We wanted to play hockey. Pond hockey was fun, providing an all day escape in the clear, crisp frozen air that graced Western New York when late November came to call.

But somehow, even that wasn’t enough. We needed an actual ice rink to play upon. Not many facilities in the area in those days, so our obvious solution was north of the border, across the bridge. 3 AM we loaded a few cars of the older guys who could drive and with our make shift pads and rusted skates, we would pool our little cash from a paper route, of grass cutting (a few of the older guys had jobs) and we would rent an hour of ice time in Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada.

The Peace Bridge was more than a crossing over the Niagara River, more than a portal into Canada. It was a lifeline to the game we loved. Early morning across the bridge.